Olenko’s Summer Fairyland Raw Vegan Popsicles

In the Vitamix or high speed blender mix :

organic mangos

organic strawberries

organic persimmons 

Pour the mixture in popsicle molds and set in the freezer for about 15 min. Then Mix:

organic raspberries

organic blueberries

Add the the second mixture on the top of the popsicles and freeze until solid. Enjoy them on a hot summer day. Very refreshing and great for kids as a healthy snack. Happy summer! 

Olenko’s Raw Vegan Pasta with Pesto and Garden Tomatoes 

I have beautiful baby tomatoes growing on my patio, basil, arugula and parsley, so I made Olenko’s Raw Vegan Red and Green Summer Pasta. Pasta is very healthy, easy to make and delicious. Try it : )

Pasta:

2-3 organic zucchini

Pesto Sauce:

1 cup organic spinach or kale

1 cup arugula

1/2 cup raw cashews or almonds or piniolli nuts

juice from 1 lemon 

bunch of parsley

bunch of basil

1-2 pices of raw garlic or more if you like garlic

pinch of pink Himalayan salt

pinch of cayenne pepper

1 cup of pure water

Topping:

raw organic olives

baby tomatoes

fresh parsley

fresh basil

Bragg nutritional yeast (optional)

Process your zucchini in spirooli. In the Vitamix mix everything for pesto sauce. Top it off with olives and tomatoes and fresh parsley. If you want you can sprinkle some nutritional yeast on the top. Serve immediately. Amazing flavor. Happy summer!

Olenko’s Raw Vegan Happy 4th of July Cake

Happy Independence Day America! I made this delicious raw vegan, law fat, gluten free and nut free cake for my friends for the 4th of July. It’s so easy to make and very refreshing. To make this cake you will need:

Bottom of the cake:

3 TBS organic gluten free oats

3 TBS raw organic cacao nibs

8 large medjool dates

In a cake form sprinkle oats and cacao nibs. Process the dates in a food processor add press them to the bottom of the cake form.

Top of the cake:

2 cups organic cubed watermelon

1 cup organic strawberries

5 very ripe organic bananas

1 TBS raw coconut nectar or maple syrup

Blend all in the Vitamix or high speed blender. Pour over the bottom layer and set in a freezer for about 6 hours or overnight. When ready to serve sprinkle the top of the cake with organic shredded coconut and decorate with fresh raspberries, blueberries, strawberries and mint. Enjoy : )

Olenko’s Happy 4th of July Hampton’s Parfait 

There is no better place than the beach for 4th of July! Sand, waves, sun, relaxation, fruits and summer fun. Happy 4th of July, whatever you are : )

Bottom Layer:

persimmon and strawberries

Middle Layer:

blueberries and strawberries

Top Layer:

bananas and rasberries

Mix each layer separately in the Vitamix or high speed blender and carefully layer each color. Top it off with fresh figs, rasberries, strawberries, cherries, mint and sweat pea. Enjoy!

Olenko’s Summer Strawberry-Watermelon Popsicles 

This popsicles are easy to make and so refreshing on a hot summer day. Great for your kids as a healthy snack at the pool, beach or a park.  My little Polish friend Julia really liked it before swimming in my pool. Have a great summer everyone : )

You will need:

organic watermelon

organic strawberries

organic banana

fresh basil from your garden

fresh mint from your garden

Blend everything in a Vitamix or high speed blender. Pour the mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. So easy, healthy, yummy and refreshing. I love summer how about you?

Olenko’s Summer Fruits Infused Water

organic watermelon

organic strawberries

organic cucumber

organic lemon

organic basil

pure water

Our body is composed of roughly 60% water. That means when we are dehydrated – and most of us spend our days constantly dehydrated to some degree – we are affecting the performance of the majority of our body. Nearly all of our systems do not function as well without the proper water intake.

So, really, what does this mean? Why should we drink more water?

  1. If you don’t drink water, you will die. It’s that important. Depending on our environment, we can live only a few days without water - maybe a week. We can live much longer without food. For most of us, we should prioritize the consumption of water far more than we currently do.
  2. Prevent cancer. Yes, that’s right – various research says staying hydrated can reduce risk of colon cancer by 45%, bladder cancer by 50%, and possibly reduce breast cancer risk as well.
  3. Be less cranky. Research says dehydration can affect your mood and make you grumpy and confused. Think clearer and be happier by drinking more water.
  4. Perform better. Proper hydration contributes to increased athletic performance. Water composes 75% of our muscle tissue! Dehydration can lead to weakness, fatigue, dizziness, and electrolyte imbalance.
  5. Lose weight. Sometimes we think we are hungry, when actually we are thirsty. Our body just starts turning on all the alarms when we ignore it. For those of you trying to drop some pounds, staying hydrated can serve as an appetite suppressant and help with weight loss.
  6. Have less joint pain. Drinking water can reduce pain in your joints by keeping the cartilage soft and hydrated. This is actually how glucosamine helps reduce joint pain, by aiding in cartilage’s absorption of water.
  7. Flush out waste and bacteria. Our digestive system needs water to function properly. Waste is flushed out in the form of urine and sweat. If we don’t drink water, we don’t flush out waste and it collects in our body causing a myriad of problems. Also combined with fiber, water can cure constipation.
  8. Prevent headaches. Sometimes headaches can be caused by dehydration, so drinking water can prevent or alleviate that nasty head pain. Next time your head hurts, try drinking water.
  9. Make your skin glow. Our skin is the largest organ in our body. Regular and plentiful water consumption can improve the color and texture of your skin by keeping it building new cells properly. Drinking water also helps the skin do it’s job of regulating the body’s temperature through sweating.
  10. Feed your body. Water is essential for the proper circulation of nutrients in the body. Water serves at the body’s transportation system and when we are dehydrated things just can’t get around as well.
Tara, Goddess of  Peace and Protection


Goddess Tara is probably the oldest goddess who is still worshipped extensively in modern times. Tara originated as a Hindu goddess, a Great Goddess — the Mother Creator, representing the eternal life force that fuels all life.

There are many embodiments of Tara, but the best known are the White Tara and the Green Tara.

The peaceful, compassionate White Tara gently protects and brings long life and peace. The more dynamic goddess, Green Tara is the “Mother Earth”, and a fierce goddess who overcomes obstacles, and saves us from physical and spiritual danger.

In Sanskrit, the name Tara means Star, but she was also called She Who Brings Forth Life, The Great Compassionate Mother, and The Embodiment of Wisdom, and the Great Protectress.

Adopted by Buddhism, she become the most widely revered deity in the Tibetan pantheon.   In Buddhist tradition, Tara is actually much greater than a goddess — she is a female Buddha, an enlightened one was has attained the highest wisdom, capability and compassion… one who can take human form and who remains in oneness with the every living thing. 




The oldest reference to the goddess Tara, perhaps, is found in an ancient saga of Finland thought to be 5 thousand years old. The saga speaks of a group known as Tar, the Women of Wisdom.

A version of the Goddess Tara exists in virtually every culture. Indeed, it is said that the Goddess Tara will assume as many forms on earth as there are needs for by the people.

The Celts called their Great Goddess Tara. Her name is thought to be the root of the word Tor, which is a mound of earth or hillock imbued with spiritual energy or connection to the other worlds.

We also hear the echo of her name in the Latin word for earth, Terra, a connection between Tara and the concept of “Mother Earth”.

The Goddess Tara is also associated with Kuan Yin, the great Chinese goddess of compassion. In South America she was known as the ancient mother goddess Tarahumara. 

The Cheyenne people revere the Star Woman who fell  from the heavens and whose body became the earth that provided them with food.

The ancient Egyptian Goddess Ishtar who, in her myths, came to earth from the heavens and instructed her people to co-mingle and intermarry with the earthlings to give them the benefits of their learning and wisdom was yet another incarnation of the Goddess Tara.




In the legends of Tibet where the worship of the Goddess Tara is still practiced  in the Buddhist tradition, it is told that the goddess Tara is the feminine counterpart of the Avalokitesvara, the Bodhisattva who is reincarnated as the Dalai Lama.

Bodhisattvas are beings who have reached enlightenment and are ‘eligible’ for Budda-hood but have postponed their own nirvana, choosing instead to be remain in the cycle of birth and rebirth in order to serve humanity and assist every being on Earth in achieving nirvana themselves.

It is told that Tara first appeared rising from a lotus blossom in the lake that had formed from Avalokitesvara’s tears of compassion, tears that fell when he first beheld the scope of suffering in the world. 

Because of her essential goodness, she was granted the right to assume her human form as a man.  But Tara elected instead to remain in her womanly form.

The Goddess Tara vowed:

"There are many who wish to gain enlightenment 
in a man’s form,
And there are few who wish to work 
for the welfare of living beings 
in a female form.   

Therefore may I, in a female body, 
work for the welfare of all beings, 
until such time as all humanity has found its fullness.”



One of the myths of the goddess Tara demonstrates her compassionate and loving nature and tells how she got the name “Tara of the Turned Face”.

An elderly woman who was a sculptor worked in a city where there was a large Buddhist temple called the Mahabodhi (Great Wisdom). She sculpted a statue of the goddess Tara and built a shrine to house it. Upon completing the project she was filled with regret when she realized that she had not considered the placement of the shrine. “Oh no,” she thought, “Tara has her back to the Mahabodhi and that isn’t right!”

Then she heard the sculpture speak to her, saying “If you are unhappy, I will look toward the Mahabodhi.” As the woman watched in amazement, the door of the shrine and the image of the goddess Tara both turned to face the Temple.

Such is the love and compassion of the goddess Tara.



The ancient goddess Tara in her many incarnations has many gifts to share with contemporary women. Tara embodies the feminine strengths of great caring and compassion, the ability to endure stressful and even terrifying moments, the acts of creation, and the source of sustenance and protection.

Demonstrating the psychological flexibility that is granted to the female spirit,  the goddess Tara,  in some of her human forms, could be quite fierce and wild. 

Refugees fleeing the horrors of the occupation of Tibet by the Chinese armies recounted numerous stories of the Green Tara that protected them during their torture and guided their flight to freedom.  

In other of her forms, such as the White Tara, she embodied inner peace and spiritual acceptance. She symbolizes purity and is thought to be part of every good and virtuous woman.


Tara is an archetype of our own inner wisdom. She guides and protects us as we navigate the depths of our unconscious minds, helping us to transform consciousness, our own personal journeys of freedom.

It is the goddess Tara who helps us to remain “centered”. The myths of the Goddess Tara remind us of our “oneness” with all of creation and the importance of nurturing the spirit within.

* Photo of my beautiful Tara taken by my talented husband Bill Winters

Tara, Goddess of Peace and Protection


Goddess Tara is probably the oldest goddess who is still worshipped extensively in modern times. Tara originated as a Hindu goddess, a Great Goddess — the Mother Creator, representing the eternal life force that fuels all life.

There are many embodiments of Tara, but the best known are the White Tara and the Green Tara.

The peaceful, compassionate White Tara gently protects and brings long life and peace. The more dynamic goddess, Green Tara is the “Mother Earth”, and a fierce goddess who overcomes obstacles, and saves us from physical and spiritual danger.

In Sanskrit, the name Tara means Star, but she was also called She Who Brings Forth Life, The Great Compassionate Mother, and The Embodiment of Wisdom, and the Great Protectress.

Adopted by Buddhism, she become the most widely revered deity in the Tibetan pantheon. In Buddhist tradition, Tara is actually much greater than a goddess — she is a female Buddha, an enlightened one was has attained the highest wisdom, capability and compassion… one who can take human form and who remains in oneness with the every living thing.


The oldest reference to the goddess Tara, perhaps, is found in an ancient saga of Finland thought to be 5 thousand years old. The saga speaks of a group known as Tar, the Women of Wisdom.

A version of the Goddess Tara exists in virtually every culture. Indeed, it is said that the Goddess Tara will assume as many forms on earth as there are needs for by the people.

The Celts called their Great Goddess Tara. Her name is thought to be the root of the word Tor, which is a mound of earth or hillock imbued with spiritual energy or connection to the other worlds.

We also hear the echo of her name in the Latin word for earth, Terra, a connection between Tara and the concept of “Mother Earth”.

The Goddess Tara is also associated with Kuan Yin, the great Chinese goddess of compassion. In South America she was known as the ancient mother goddess Tarahumara.

The Cheyenne people revere the Star Woman who fell from the heavens and whose body became the earth that provided them with food.

The ancient Egyptian Goddess Ishtar who, in her myths, came to earth from the heavens and instructed her people to co-mingle and intermarry with the earthlings to give them the benefits of their learning and wisdom was yet another incarnation of the Goddess Tara.


In the legends of Tibet where the worship of the Goddess Tara is still practiced in the Buddhist tradition, it is told that the goddess Tara is the feminine counterpart of the Avalokitesvara, the Bodhisattva who is reincarnated as the Dalai Lama.

Bodhisattvas are beings who have reached enlightenment and are ‘eligible’ for Budda-hood but have postponed their own nirvana, choosing instead to be remain in the cycle of birth and rebirth in order to serve humanity and assist every being on Earth in achieving nirvana themselves.

It is told that Tara first appeared rising from a lotus blossom in the lake that had formed from Avalokitesvara’s tears of compassion, tears that fell when he first beheld the scope of suffering in the world.

Because of her essential goodness, she was granted the right to assume her human form as a man. But Tara elected instead to remain in her womanly form.

The Goddess Tara vowed:

"There are many who wish to gain enlightenment
in a man’s form,
And there are few who wish to work
for the welfare of living beings
in a female form.

Therefore may I, in a female body,
work for the welfare of all beings,
until such time as all humanity has found its fullness.”

One of the myths of the goddess Tara demonstrates her compassionate and loving nature and tells how she got the name “Tara of the Turned Face”.

An elderly woman who was a sculptor worked in a city where there was a large Buddhist temple called the Mahabodhi (Great Wisdom). She sculpted a statue of the goddess Tara and built a shrine to house it. Upon completing the project she was filled with regret when she realized that she had not considered the placement of the shrine. “Oh no,” she thought, “Tara has her back to the Mahabodhi and that isn’t right!”

Then she heard the sculpture speak to her, saying “If you are unhappy, I will look toward the Mahabodhi.” As the woman watched in amazement, the door of the shrine and the image of the goddess Tara both turned to face the Temple.

Such is the love and compassion of the goddess Tara.


The ancient goddess Tara in her many incarnations has many gifts to share with contemporary women. Tara embodies the feminine strengths of great caring and compassion, the ability to endure stressful and even terrifying moments, the acts of creation, and the source of sustenance and protection.

Demonstrating the psychological flexibility that is granted to the female spirit, the goddess Tara, in some of her human forms, could be quite fierce and wild.

Refugees fleeing the horrors of the occupation of Tibet by the Chinese armies recounted numerous stories of the Green Tara that protected them during their torture and guided their flight to freedom.

In other of her forms, such as the White Tara, she embodied inner peace and spiritual acceptance. She symbolizes purity and is thought to be part of every good and virtuous woman.



Tara is an archetype of our own inner wisdom. She guides and protects us as we navigate the depths of our unconscious minds, helping us to transform consciousness, our own personal journeys of freedom.

It is the goddess Tara who helps us to remain “centered”. The myths of the Goddess Tara remind us of our “oneness” with all of creation and the importance of nurturing the spirit within.

* Photo of my beautiful Tara taken by my talented husband Bill Winters